Thanksgiving Honesty

Thanksgiving is upon us. What is it that you have to be thankful for this year?

Your health?

Your friends and family?

Your job and the ability to make ends meet?

That all your basic needs are met and you’re able to enjoy life without too much worry?

Take a step back from your life for a moment and consider what it would be if just one of those three things were missing for you right now in this festive season.

I have not health. I have not a leg to stand on and I have not the freedom to even leave the house except for appointments.

I have not a job and because of the lack of health I am not able to go work at a job I’m qualified for because what I do requires me to be physically present.

I have not the ability to make ends meet. Not anymore. I’m between the largest rock and hard place I’ve ever been in thus far in my life.

I have the love of family and friends… but love doesn’t pay the bills.

When I was first hospitalized in April, May, and June this year, everyone was full of love and support with offers of visits, food trains, and help but I learned a long time ago that what people promise they don’t usually deliver; when promising feels so good there isn’t necessarily an impetus to follow through. So while others are considering what to buy in their Black Friday shopping for their loved ones and themselves, I’m considering what I must do at this point to pay rent for another month.

Sell a kidney maybe?!

Is there a section for that on eBay?

I don’t know a lot at the moment, but I do know that there are a lot of people out there who have a hell of a lot to be thankful for and they’re missing it because they’re caught up in the search for the things that don’t really matter at the end of the day.

If you have your health, be thankful.

If you have loved ones, be thankful.

If you have a job, be thankful.

If you don’t have to worry about basic necessities of life, be thankful.

And if you have extra this year, find a place to be generous simply because you are able to do so. You never know when you will be the one in need of the kindness of strangers.

19 thoughts on “Thanksgiving Honesty

  1. Argh I hate to “like” this. I shall not make platitudes nor hollow statements, as you’ve had your share of those. Another reason to feel anger against the “not worthy”. Fuck…just said I wasn’t going to do that. Fuck it…deserved to be said. And I’ll continue to say. I so wish my words alone could bring some peace…some respite…some fucking justice.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. I think that there must be a way for some people to really see that it doesn’t take much to help. It’s just that all the people you know need to remember where you are and what you truly need. My prayers for more people to open their eyes and notice. A new outfit for themselves or send some rent or grocery money to you. You are thought of and remembered tomorrow and every day. Happy Thanksgiving to you and Kristian. It isn’t the food, it’s the thoughts and togetherness. Bless both of you.
    Your aunt Joan❤️

    Liked by 3 people

  3. And bring me some damn flowers!!! (an old post I wrote because people hardly ever stay with you for the long haul but at first you can’t sneeze without 10 boxes of tissues being sent your way…then they fade off into the sunset) I do not know how people can’t be happy for the simplest things, but when you have a chronic condition, you have a laundry list of memories you’d like to be thankful for again… those who don’t get ‘chronic’ just can’t wrap their head around this concept of KNOWING you will never be the person you once were, that time is done. Excellent post Kit~Kim

    Liked by 3 people

    • Thank you, Kim!

      It’s amazing to me, it truly is, how ungrateful people are and how much they take for granted. At church on Sunday there was a special speaker who called down anyone with a need for healing to be prayed for and there were tears over things that to me seem so small. I felt guilty for looking at them and thinking, “oh that’s all?!” when I have ALL of this. Like, I get that your broken foot is a bummer right now, I really do; but I don’t have a foot to break.

      And the people who aren’t there for the long haul?! So sad and so true. It’s like it is annoying and inconvenient for them that I’m living with chronic illness. Everyone visits when you’re in the hospital and everyone calls. Once you go home with all your problems in tow, it’s mostly no one who comes to visit and no one who calls. Thanks for seeing that angle! Thanks for understanding. Thanks for reminding me I’m not alone in this boat called the S.S. Chronic.

      Kit

      Liked by 3 people

  4. I thought I’d maybe make it to 50 years old. I have surpassed that. On my birthdays I celebrate another year of being alive. Of living and seeing each step and day of the way my path goes. The older I get the happier I get. I am able to watch my children grow and live their lives. Spend time with my husband and still with my mother. I drink each day like a good glass of wine. Slowly and fully. Using all of my senses. To be thankful for anytime I am given. It may be gone tomorrow. This is the one thing that most people don’t see or feel. They think life goes on. We know better. Enjoy and love today for what it is. 🌹

    Liked by 1 person

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