Faerie Queene (Not Edmund Spencer’s epic but accompanied by The Sound of My Day: “The Faerie Queene”)

Have ye beheld the Faerie Queene?
By those worthy is she seen

In her truest form and face:
Tall and shapely, she stands in grace,

Ethereal beauty, purest heart,
Perfect and blameless, just to start.

Otherworldly, above the rest,
Among the Fey she is most bless’d.

Alabaster skin and eyes sea blue,
Auburn hair with red lips too.

Standing out, she has no peer
In wisdom or talent, that is clear.

Hidden in the world of men
Her grace and glow are veiled, but then

She somehow always draws them nigh.
Bewitching smiles that makes men sigh,

Shining eyes that stories tell
And once are told will make hearts swell,

Infectious laughter, and rosy cheeks,
These are the treasures that brave men seek.

A damsel fair is what they see,
“We’ll save!” they vow on bended knee.

They strive and toil, they love and dream,
They assume by what is seen.

“She’s weak.” “She’s weary.” “Wounded!” they say
Never knowing that she’s a Fey!

You see, this is no helpless girl,
This woman bears strength from another world.

She needs no man to Hold her Fast
Or guide her way; her skills are vast.

No need of a champion, the Fairie Queene has,
As she treads her Epic’s paths.

A traveling companion, that’s another thing:
A knight? A minstrel? Perhaps a King?

The Faerie Queene knows what she’s about;
If another knows he’ll have no doubt:

She’ll have lifted the veil, exposed her heart,
And shown him that he’s set apart.

Have ye beheld the Faerie Queene?
Are you worthy? Have you seen?


“The Faerie Queene”

Original composition for Irish harp attributed to Turlough O’Carolan (although some melodic themes were borrowed from existing songs)

Performed by Shelley Phillips, Pavane, 1995

26 thoughts on “Faerie Queene (Not Edmund Spencer’s epic but accompanied by The Sound of My Day: “The Faerie Queene”)

  1. What a magician.
    It’s interesting how the ideal of beauty has changed over time. Fair complexion, rosy cheeks and blond hair were associated with virtue in 16th century England, unlike dark, considered pretty nowadays, which was was the epitome of something mysterious, hidden, devilish, wicked. This means I’d have been evil incarnate had I lived in times of Spencer, and earlier. Go away scary witch, go away…

    Liked by 1 person

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